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Unread 09-18-2023, 12:44 PM   #41
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Thanks for that post Garth. Glad to hear they still take customers reviews seriously. My experience was the first bad one I've had there in many years. I guess I've given up on seeing a true hunting and fishing store like they once existed. The reason is easy enough. The money is in clothing. A friend of mine owned an Orvis store and he made all his money on belts, socks shirts and pants. The guns and ammo were basically loss leaders.
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Unread 09-18-2023, 12:58 PM   #42
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dave Noreen View Post
In the old days my family was very into the 16-inch Russell Ike Waltons.

Attachment 119149

There was an old pair or two around the house, but everybody was wearing 8 to 10-inch boots by the time I started hunting. I found a good condition pair of Ike Waltons in my size at St Vincents and wore them a few times but that was a lot of lacing!!

And they didnít have the speed-lace hooksÖ





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Unread 09-18-2023, 01:43 PM   #43
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I wore my 6 or 8 inch ll Bean boots at Markover this past Sunday while pheasant hunting. The cover was very thick and in the second field we hunted I didn't see the stream that was running under the thick cover and stepped right in. And you guessed it, the water went way over my Bean boots. Had I worn my Muck boots, this would not have happened. In the future while hunting pheasants at Markover, I'll wear my Mucks. Oh, I agree with many of the previous comments, the Bean boots just don't provide sufficient ankle support and stability over rough terrain.
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Unread 09-18-2023, 05:03 PM   #44
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If it's too cold to wear my Allegash shorts, I'm in a pair of Bean jeans. 365.
So what they're made in Mexico; ALL jeans are made in Mexico. I was disappointed when they went to five belt loops from seven, and said as much to the sales woman. She took my name and telephone number, and called me two weeks later to say she found me four pairs from several other stores, which I bought right then and there. I get enough Bean Bucks back on my credit card to get a new pair every couple of months. I can't get that kind of attention anywhere else.
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LL Beanís guns on display
Unread 09-18-2023, 05:56 PM   #45
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Default LL Beanís guns on display

Brett Neville who oversees the LL Bean archives kindly provided the following information on the two guns once owned by LL Bean that are on display in the Hunting and Fishing department in the Freeport store.


Model 8 Remington
Serial Number: 51647
Owner: Leon L. Bean to Leon A. Gorman

Chambered in 25 Remington, a semi-automatic rifle featuring a 22" barrel with open sights. The barrel is covered by a full-length rube that encloses the recoil spring. Blued with walnut stock. This particular Model 8 made circa 1926. Add 85% value for .25 Remington.

Historical Notes: The 25 Remington is one of a series of rimless cartridges developed for the Model 8 auto-loading rifle. It was introduced in 1906 and discontinued in 1936 with approximately 80,600 total production.

Designer/Inventor: John M. Browning, C.C. Loomis.

No rifles have chambered this cartridge since 1942 and the ammunition companies stopped loading it about 1950.

NOTES: The Model 8 was one of the earliest American semiauto rifles. John Browning's patent application was filed June 6, 1900, and U.S. Patent # 659,786 was granted on October 16, 1900. Browning immediately sold the patent to Remington, which started producing the rifle in 1906.

Remington introduced the Model 8 during a time when the company was offering few new centerfire models. The gun saw a production run of 30 years in which over 80,000 of the autoloaders where produced. Most had 22-inch barrels with plain open sights. Although no variations of the gun were offered, five different grades were produced ranging from the plainest Standard grade to the most deluxe Premier Grade. Mid grades included the Special, Peerless and Expert grades. Quality of wood and degree of checkering and engraving mainly differentiated these grades.

The gun was produced in four calibers: the Remington .25, .30, .32 and .35. This family of cartridges was designed to compete directly with Winchester, except in rimless form. The .25 Rem. was the alternative to .25-35 WCF; likewise, the .30 Rem, competed for the .30-30 market; and the .32 Remington went head-to-head with the .32 Win Special. The big brother of the family, the well known .35 Remington, was designed as a ballistic equivalent to the 33 Winchester. This cartridge found its own niche in the market and is the only cartridge from the series still produced by the major ammunition companies.

The Model 8's demise was more a function of timing than anything else. The gun entered a market dominated by a host of .30-30 lever guns, including the indomitable Winchester Model 94. The Model 8's design had some distinct advantages, namely speed of fire and that its box magazine allowed for the use of spitzer bullets. However, the then 12-year-old Model 94 juggernaut was at full steam and eventually proved more dominant.
Technical Overview

The Model 8 is recoil-operated with a rotating bolt and double-locking lugs. The gun fires from a fixed 5-shot magazine and is equipped with a bolt hold-open that engages after the last shot is fired. The autoloading action was made more revolutionary by the incorporation of a barrel that was shrouded in a full-length jacket. When the gun is fired, the barrel moves backward inside the shroud. This arrangement is largely believed to be the first effective recoil reduction system.
Designed in a day when travel by train was common, the 8-pound, 41-inch carbine was built on a take-down design for ease of transport and cleaning. Take down is accomplished by removing the forearm to access an integral barrel wrench. Once loosed, the wrench releases the barrel. As the barrel, including chamber and the open sights, remain in one piece, this feature does not negatively affect accuracy.

With its semiautomatic action, shrouded barrel, streamlined magazine/trigger guard unit and Kalashnikov-looking safety, the Model 8 was as much on the cutting edge at the turn of the century as Remington's electronic rifles are today. At the time of its 1906 inception, the Model 8's clean and modern look was unspoiled by excessive external controls: slide handle, slide release, safety and trigger -- that's it.

Custom Made Parker (DH Grade) 20-gauge Shotgun
Serial Number: 206188
Owner: Leon L. Bean to Leon A. Gorman


Parker 206188 was made in 1923. Approximately 9,966 were made with barrels of fine Titanic steel (without figure) a very strong, serviceable barrel, in all gauges. About 1,536 of the 9,966 were made in the 20-gauge. Only about 280 were built with Parker single triggers.

The stock is of fine imported walnut; silver shield: fine checkering and engraving; skeleton butt plate.

The Parker quality D.H. gun met the demand for a popular priced gun. Grade for this gun was said to have no equal; a handsome, durable, and sterling gun of exceptional value.

NOTE: I have checked with the Parker Gun Collectors Association and they do not have records on this particular gun, other than the year it was manufactured, which according to the Serial No. was 1923. According to Leonís story (below), the gun was custom made for L.L. Bean sometime ďin the late 1930s.Ē L.L. went to Boston at some point, early 1940 to have eye surgery. Claire Bean was his nurse and they married July 27, 1940. Perhaps after L.L. lost his eye, he had the gun retrofited to match Leonís description below?

HISTORIC NOTES: According to L.L.ís grandson, Leon Gorman, L.L. had this particular shotgun made after he lost the use of his right eye in the late 1930s. The stock was offset to the right so that when L.L. brought the gun up to his right shoulder (he was a right handed shooter), the barrels would come under his left eye. The gun was a 20-gauge, but bored tight for a duck hunting choke; L.L. needed the lighter recoil of the 20-gauge (compared to the standard 12-gauge) because he was afraid of injuring his left eye. A very unique piece made by Americaís premier manufacturer of shotguns.
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Unread 09-18-2023, 06:07 PM   #46
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Interesting that Brett Neville has information that the PGCA doesn't have, specifically that "only about 280 were made with Parker Single Triggers."





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Not because I think they're better than the other breeds,
but because I'm a romantic - stuck on tradition - and to me, a Setter just "belongs" in the grouse picture."

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Unread 09-19-2023, 07:17 AM   #47
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LLís grandson, Leon A Gorman is the person most responsible for guiding the company into the modern age. He became President after LLís death in 1967 and then Chairman of the Board, and later, Chairman Emeritus until his death in 2015.
Leon was highly respected and beloved. When he died, they closed the flagship store that day, the first time that had happened since 1967.

Although the business is approaching $2B in sales and will probably hit it by 2025, LLBean is still a private company and family held. Shawn Gorman, Leonís nephew was named Chairman in 2013.
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Unread 09-23-2023, 10:37 AM   #48
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Default LL Bean

I wondered if anyone else had one older?
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