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Unread 12-05-2022, 03:52 PM   #11
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charlie cleveland
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I had a stuck trigger guard on a 1894 Remington double barrel I soaked it for a week with kroll oil then wd -40 no luck...put the hot wrench to it and poured water on it till cool and it screwed right off...some times it takes heat and cooled with water the steam makes the rust break lose....my job you to consist of takeing out car exhaust manifold studs out for the muffler shops..a torch a water hose and a pair of vise grips got most of them some times I had to weld a nut to them also then do the heat thing and the threads will still be good...I ve had to do this as much as 4 times on a really stubborn bolt..this is the best method I know of for anythink that's stuck with rust....charlie
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Unread 12-05-2022, 06:17 PM   #12
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“Sour Apples” and “Perverted message”? Please clarify what exactly was said by anyone that was cruel or inaccurate. I really would like to know.
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Unread 12-05-2022, 10:55 PM   #13
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todd allen
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I had to go back and reread my post to make sure I wasn't one of the offenders. I have enough reverence for these guns that if I sensed someone might be over his head with a classic, no matter grade or condition, to seek out a pro, if for nothing else than an evaluation.
I've always gone by the old saying "do no harm. That said, I still think the gun might have some potential. I'm not advocating for a full restoration, maybe just clean up, starting with the trigger guard.
I would love to see more pictures, BTW. And stock dimensions.
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Unread 12-06-2022, 08:29 AM   #14
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john pulis
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There are several SxS smiths up here in the NE and in the mid and South that could do this for you if you do not want to attempt it yourself. Good luck.
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Unread 12-15-2022, 10:42 PM   #15
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paul golston
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This may be a little late but .... Get yure a Wheeler hollow ground screwdriver set . Loosen the screw at the top over the tang behind the hammers . That an be a interference fit with the trigger guard.
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Unread 12-15-2022, 11:57 PM   #16
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The trigger guard should come off after removing the two screws you have taken out and by unscrewing it as you mentioned. I think that the implication of your question to the people that do this a lot is that it is not something you likely have a lot of experience with. I just happened to do this to a similar model three times this afternoon. If you do it a lot, you soon realize that the trigger guard (and the locks) fit very tight in the inletting on high quality guns of any brand. After they set a lot, they can seem like they are cemented in place and take quite a bit of effort to free. You can easily ruin the inletting around them with simple prying, pulling and twisting. Don't ever try to stick a metal tool in around the inletting to remove them. I usually have a couple of chopsticks or tounge depressors around to whittle and stick under tight pieces. Stick it under the piece away from the inletting and pry upward gently. The small y shaped area at the back of the trigger guard is a good place, with the protruding end padded by a piece of plastic or thin wood. The back of the trigger guard can be worked out of the inlet carefully. At that point unscrew the guard as you saw. What they don't show is that the guard bow will often drag on the bottom of the frame and hit the front trigger. You will learn by experience that you may have to manipulate the lifter and the trigger as you unscrew in order to clear these. Be careful, and you will get the guard off. The lockes fit even tighter, but are not hard to remove by the using the partially backed out screw to knock the opposite side off, then a slightly larger punch from the other side to tap the second lock off. Again be very careful and more so in reinstalling.

After that it gets to be a test of motor skills. There are some very small screws involved that are up in the action and will test the abilities of your fingers and your use of some really small screwdrivers.

The large screw mentioned above is actually screwed into the trigger plate, so doesn't have to be removed to take off the guard. If you take it out, be careful and, again, know what you are doing. Like all the action screws, it is big, tight and easy to bugger. If the screwdriver slips, you will have damaged an indexed, damaged screw and fixing it is not cheap.

None of this is complex, and the average person can understand the mechanism enough to take it apart and reassemble. The problem is that the average tinkerer and handyman doesn't have the motor skill set it takes to work on very small and closely fitted parts that often take a large amount of effort to move. And too, it takes more tools of a greater range of sizes than you would guess.

I have always been an advocate of learning and doing. However, you have to commit to putting in the investment to learn and to developing the skills needed.
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Unread 12-16-2022, 10:58 AM   #17
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Art touches on some very important points and gives very good advice.

I would FIRST make sure you have a good set of gunsmithing turnscrews (screwdrivers) and proceed with caution while applying firm even pressure as you try to break the screws free. Make sure the screw slots are clean and free of crud!!

My trick for a stuck in the wood trigger guard strap or tang is, after the screws are removed and the tang won't lift from the channel in the wood because of hardened 100-year-old crud, don't try to lift it or you may chip or splinter the wood...
Instead, rap the rear of the trigger guard bow firmly in in a motion that will drive it forward. It should break free pretty easily after just one or two firm raps and will lift up with no damage to the wood at all. Then rotate the trigger guard in a counter-clockwise motion. If it will not rotate freely it will need some solvent on the threaded area. Attempting to force it will only result in a bent and distorted trigger guard and they're an absolute bitch to straighten them back to the correct shape and angle... ask me how I know...





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Unread 12-16-2022, 11:24 AM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Dean Romig View Post
Art touches on some very important points and gives very good advice.

I would FIRST make sure you have a good set of gunsmithing turnscrews (screwdrivers) and proceed with caution while applying firm even pressure as you try to break the screws free. Make sure the screw slots are clean and free of crud!!

My trick for a stuck in the wood trigger guard strap or tang is, after the screws are removed and the tang won't lift from the channel in the wood because of hardened 100-year-old crud, don't try to lift it or you may chip or splinter the wood...
Instead, rap the rear of the trigger guard bow firmly in in a motion that will drive it forward. It should break free pretty easily after just one or two firm raps and will lift up with no damage to the wood at all. Then rotate the trigger guard in a counter-clockwise motion. If it will not rotate freely it will need some solvent on the threaded area. Attempting to force it will only result in a bent and distorted trigger guard and they're an absolute bitch to straighten them back to the correct shape and angle... ask me how I know...





.
The knocking forward advice is an "a-ha!" idea. Use wood or plastic.

Dean is right about the straightening/reshaping. Not hard to do physically but it reminds me of trying to mold cooked spaghetti, if you get the idea.
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Unread 12-16-2022, 01:25 PM   #19
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A guard that will not twist out is a very common occurrence and it more than likely the issue here. The problem is easily solved by someone who knows what they are doing. And the issue gets out of hand quick by someone who doesnt.
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Unread 12-19-2022, 10:03 PM   #20
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Rick is right Brian. Sometimes a light forward tap with a small rubber mallot on back of the trigger guard will free it. Push the trigger guard forward while lifting it out. After removing the plates, drop the push button under lifter. There's a small screw behind the left plate to free the lifter from the locking bolt. Remove the top tang bolt, then the trigger plate. I figured disassembly out on my own, but I've taken alot of doubles apart prior. Take your time. As Brian Dudley said, you could do harm, or cause damage if not familiar with this gun. There may even be a member who lives close that would be glad to walk you through it! Lots of help here, and some great folks. Im sure everyone means well . These guns are easy to work on after you've done a couple.

Chris, AZ
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