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forearm chip Beretta 687 Grade V
Unread 10-02-2022, 10:43 PM   #1
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Scott Chapman
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Default forearm chip Beretta 687 Grade V

Was cleaning guns today and I knocked a small chip from forearm of my favorite O/U Beretta 687 Grade V 28 gauge...dang it!

Anyone have a wood repair specialist that I might be able to send this to?
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Unread 10-02-2022, 11:26 PM   #2
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It looks like a clean chip. It is nothing that good superglue will not fix.
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Unread 10-03-2022, 09:10 AM   #3
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Get some "Hot Stuff Glue" and glue it back on.
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Unread 10-03-2022, 03:40 PM   #4
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What they said. Use a good grade, and my advice would be to not use a thickened grade. As close as that should fit, a thin glue will bond well and not squeeze out a permanent glue line. A lot of people don't know that art woodworkers often use superglue as a finish on wood turnings. They put a light coat on a pad and pressure it against the turning. It smooths out and the mild heat generated cures the glue instantly and it takes on a nice sheen, much like an oil finish. That doesn't look like a supergloss finish. If it were me, I would use a thin SG, apply the piece and hold it in an upright position so any runs are on the inside (with masking tape added close on both sides as a block). As soon as the glue is holding, wipe off any runs, remove the tape and polish the finish all around with a soft cloth and a goodly amount of hand pressure. Use a little gunstock polish and wax to finish if needed.
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Unread 10-03-2022, 06:35 PM   #5
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Thank you all for your comments! I am a little worried that I will screw it up.

I'll try the thin set and mask it up with some blue tape. I will try to suck up the glue in a tuberculin syringe.
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Unread 10-03-2022, 09:14 PM   #6
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You might want to practice on a scrap piece of hardwood that has very small cracks. & chips. Thin superglue is very thin and will run places you don’t expect.

Chip like that I would use a thicker grade Superglue. Put a small puddle on a jar lid etc, use a small needle, pick up a dot of glue and place it on the upright forend. Larger chip more dots. With a tweezer place the chip in place most fingers too big not precise enough.

Hobby shops best source of super glues in various viscosity

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Unread 10-08-2022, 09:45 PM   #7
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Scott, pm me. I fix this kind of stuff all the time. I use the Hot stuff, and it works great, while remaining undetectable when finished
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Unread 10-08-2022, 11:04 PM   #8
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I have used the Satellite City cyanoacrylates for many years for repairs like this. Great stuff.

https://www.caglue.com/HK-1-bHot-Stu...nder_p_39.html
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Unread 10-09-2022, 11:38 AM   #9
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There was a chip reglued very poorly in my Knick forend when I got it; I sent it to Mark Larson and the repair disappeared. Just a suggestion in case you screw it up .
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Unread 10-21-2022, 03:09 PM   #10
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I was very nervous about messing it up...Brian Dudley is going to try his hand at it.
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