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Name that pattern
Unread 06-22-2021, 06:29 PM   #1
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Breck Gorman
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Default Name that pattern

Not a Parker. But I thought it was certainly interesting enough to share this unusual pattern.
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Unread 06-22-2021, 06:48 PM   #2
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Following and waiting for Dr. Drew to chime in.
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Unread 06-22-2021, 07:01 PM   #3
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Appears to be two-iron something or other…





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Unread 06-23-2021, 09:46 AM   #4
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Thank you Breck and very interesting. I have never seen such striking contrast between the 2 rods used to fabricate the tubes (Dean is correct) and I can't imagine that the contrast was not purposeful.

This is Parker D3 (3 Iron) which clearly shows that the "scroll" is composed of the edges of adjacent rods, with a wavy "zipper" weld between, the 'stars' are from the same twisted rod, and that the ribband edge weld is straight



SO Breck's pattern has one rod staining more darkly alternating with one rod staining less so.

E. Heuse-Lemoine of Liege said in 1884 that the pattern coloring and contrast was dependent on the source of the coal, the source of the iron, and whether charcoal, coke or coal was used by the smelter. I suspect, but it is only a guess, that the tube makers chose rods which colored differently, and used one of each simply for the aesthetic contrast.

Last edited by Drew Hause; 06-23-2021 at 11:09 AM..
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Unread 06-23-2021, 10:10 AM   #5
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That barrel pattern is outstanding, and so I bet the rest of the gun is too!
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Unread 06-23-2021, 10:31 AM   #6
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I once bought a POS GH on the 1 1/2 frame with blued Damascus barrels cut back from 30" to 27 with .003" and .002" chokes. I had Dale Edmonds refinish the barrels and as it turned out the D3 pattern had a winding in it similar to the variation in color of the subject gun. It was a fine Skeet gun though.


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File Type: jpg Dale Edmonds Work.jpg (179.0 KB, 13 views)
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Unread 06-23-2021, 01:08 PM   #7
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The material composition of the metals will dictate how it etches. Carbon content is key and can be a factor derived from smelting and or the working of the metal as well as the original composition of the ore. Other elements can also play a role, It seems the alternating pattern is deliberate. The gun looks fancy but the material in the barrel seems to be of low quality and shows a lot of porosity which I assume is from the etch.
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Unread 06-23-2021, 01:30 PM   #8
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Aaron is correct.
Steel with manganese (AISI 10XX Carbon Steel or 15XX Carbon Steels) will typically etch black. The steel component of pattern welded barrels was low carbon - AISI 1005 in the 3 crolle specimens I had composition tested.
Nickel will produce silver, and chromium gray.
Higher carbon also = harder steel which will etch darker.

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Unread 06-23-2021, 02:16 PM   #9
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Some of the earliest steel was actually carburized iron, or wrought iron which was soaked at heat in a carbon rich atmosphere. When you etch this 'steel' it will show dark due to the carbon but the material is no more resistant to the acid than wrought iron. It can be hard to get a good etch for contrast because the two materials dont erode at signifigantly different rates. It can also be hard to get crisp looking patterns in this instance for the same reasons. At least that was my experience which was admittedly limited sample wise.
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Twist vs Plain Twist
Unread 06-28-2021, 09:57 PM   #10
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Default Twist vs Plain Twist

My PH 16, circa 1891 letters with Twist steel barrels per the Order book. The stock book says Plain Twist. What is the difference between the two?
The rib inscription says Twist.
Sorry, meant to start a new thread, but dont know how to move it now.
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