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Need some help with wood finish
Unread 05-14-2019, 05:40 AM   #1
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Rick Riddell
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Default Need some help with wood finish

So I have been honing my skills with oil finishes, I have a nice coat but there is too much shine, is there anyway to knock back the shine without ruining the finish? Perhaps 1500 grit and then a final waxing? Any help or advice would be great!
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Unread 05-14-2019, 06:35 AM   #2
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I have used pumice mixed with linseed oil. Pumice in a cloth folded into a pad dipped in linseed oil and lightly rubbed on stock. It will make a slurry that is mildly abrasive and going slowly you will find how much you need to do in order to achieve what you want. I have used this on oil, poly and other finishes. Would like to try auto rubbing compound next time but have no projects at this time.
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Unread 05-14-2019, 07:00 AM   #3
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Brian Board has the solution----------"Timber Lux"
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Unread 05-14-2019, 07:52 AM   #4
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Just checked the box and it is a grade of pumice called rotten stone, the finest grit, made by a co. called Rainbow. It is made for that purpose.
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Unread 05-14-2019, 08:13 AM   #5
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Allan H. Swanson View Post
Brian Board has the solution----------"Timber Lux"
I agree, after trying all sorts of commercially available offerings, and a few private recipes of professional gunmakers.

For me, it really is the easiest, and most forgiving. I do pay attention to what Brian has told me about keeping the humidity about 35% and temp 70-75 seem to be ideal conditions.
Too shiny for taste, you can knock it back with fine steel wool. I recently did my pheasant gun, which had patches of original finish, but I got it good and wet last fall. 2 lite applications of Timberlux and it looks vintage correct, and has better protection.

www.timberluxe.com
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Unread 05-14-2019, 08:21 AM   #6
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Thanks guys for the replys, I already have finished the stock with about 10 coats of oil, sanded each coat and reapplied, the finish looks really good, just too shiny for my liking, will timberluxe knock it back? I think I might try the pumice, but a little nervous as this finish took a lot of hours. I just need to get the glare knocked back without turning the finish white. maybe a 1500 grit sanding then the timberluxe?
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Unread 05-14-2019, 08:56 AM   #7
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I have used 1500 wet sanding and found it to dull and patchy. Try the rottenstone on an old stock first to get a '' feel'' for it and I think it will give you the result you want. I bought it years ago at a paint store, if you have a hard time finding it I will send you some.
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Unread 05-14-2019, 04:19 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rick Riddell View Post
Thanks guys for the replys, I already have finished the stock with about 10 coats of oil, sanded each coat and reapplied, the finish looks really good, just too shiny for my liking, will timberluxe knock it back? I think I might try the pumice, but a little nervous as this finish took a lot of hours. I just need to get the glare knocked back without turning the finish white. maybe a 1500 grit sanding then the timberluxe?
I use pumace, but it can be done by going over the stock very lightly with the finest steel wool. If you go too far, just apply another coat or two of oil and rub off with a clean cotton cloth. Are you using straight linseed oil or an oil based finish?

Also, Birchwood Casey's stock polish can be used to take off some of the sheen. Just go very lightly.

Timberlux is a finish and is not used to knock back the sheen on a stock.
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Unread 05-14-2019, 06:03 PM   #9
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Originally Posted by Tom Flanigan View Post
I use pumace, but it can be done by going over the stock very lightly with the finest steel wool. If you go too far, just apply another coat or two of oil and rub off with a clean cotton cloth. Are you using straight linseed oil or an oil based finish?

Also, Birchwood Casey's stock polish can be used to take off some of the sheen. Just go very lightly.

Timberlux is a finish and is not used to knock back the sheen on a stock.
Hey Tom, I used Minwax antique oil, it was easy to use and gave a nice mirror finish, but thats not what I thought it was going to do, I did sand with 1500 and boiled linseed and the finish came out right where I wanted it, I'll have to go over it again as there were some small dips I couldnt see where the oil cured, but after sanding and adding linseed I can see where its shiny from the minwax.
Thanks guys for all your help I really do appreciate it!
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Unread 05-16-2019, 05:48 AM   #10
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Rick, before you try to dull down your finish, make sure it is fully cured. Especially if it's an oil finish. What i like to do is take an old mustard bottle and mix some mineral oil with rottenstone. The ratio is not important, just put in enough rottenstone to thicken it up so it's not so runny. Shake it up and squirt some on a soft cotton cloth and rub away with circular,even motion. The rottenstone along with the mineral oil is so fine that it's cutting action is very slow and subtle. You will have to wipe the stock with mineral spirits to check your progress due to the mineral oil making the finish still shine. I have found this to be effective an effective way without removing to much at a time.
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