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Old 12-06-2018, 08:16 AM   #11
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I have a question and not trying to pose an argument or be contrary, just want to know the basis for the notion. For the record I am believer of squaring the load or the shot column as best fit to a gauge of gun to get most shot in a pattern and limiting shot string. Recoil is not a factor in my thought.

What are the limitations and difference of performance in a 3/4 ounce load versus a 1 ounce load in a 16. I have always shot 1 ounce loads in my 16 and never thought about something less. Less shot in the pattern is just what it is, less shot in the pattern. Essentially if your shooting 3/4 ounce load that is a 28 gauge load. Are you saying that a 28 gauge load in tight chokes of 16 gauge is like shooting open chokes for a 28 gauge. A 3/4 load for a 16 is going to be probably less than a square shot column unless RST has redesigned the shot cup.

A 1 ounce load is considered the perfect load for a 16 gauge. A 3/4 load is considered the ideal load for a 28 gauge. I can see shooting a light load in a heavier gun like a 16 gauge would diminish recoil but is that the only factor. I that the case an not worried about recoil then why not shoot a 28 gauge instead if you that gun in your quiver.

Just wondering. BTW it is same discussion for say a 7/8 load which is ideal for say a 20 gauge.
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Old 12-06-2018, 10:15 AM   #12
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Love my 16’s!!
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Old 12-06-2018, 12:09 PM   #13
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Todd Poer View Post
I have a question and not trying to pose an argument or be contrary, just want to know the basis for the notion. For the record I am believer of squaring the load or the shot column as best fit to a gauge of gun to get most shot in a pattern and limiting shot string. Recoil is not a factor in my thought.

What are the limitations and difference of performance in a 3/4 ounce load versus a 1 ounce load in a 16. I have always shot 1 ounce loads in my 16 and never thought about something less. Less shot in the pattern is just what it is, less shot in the pattern. Essentially if your shooting 3/4 ounce load that is a 28 gauge load. Are you saying that a 28 gauge load in tight chokes of 16 gauge is like shooting open chokes for a 28 gauge. A 3/4 load for a 16 is going to be probably less than a square shot column unless RST has redesigned the shot cup.

A 1 ounce load is considered the perfect load for a 16 gauge. A 3/4 load is considered the ideal load for a 28 gauge. I can see shooting a light load in a heavier gun like a 16 gauge would diminish recoil but is that the only factor. I that the case an not worried about recoil then why not shoot a 28 gauge instead if you that gun in your quiver.

Just wondering. BTW it is same discussion for say a 7/8 load which is ideal for say a 20 gauge.

I was told years ago the three most ballistically "efficient" rounds were the 10 gauge 2 7/8" with 1 1/4 ounces , the 16 with an ounce and the 28 with 3/4's of an ounce . I tend to try to stick to those . Nothing wrong with less or more if that's what floats a persons boat .
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Old 12-06-2018, 03:53 PM   #14
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Jay, BTW I like your new to you 16. I also have 16 VH from 1907 it is numbered 144842. It has 28 inch barrels on 1 frame choked modified and full.

Use it mostly for dove hunting and continental pheasant. Killed a high tailing pheasant dead as a hammer using lead #6 in 1 ounce load. Estimated it was about 50 yards when I shot but landed about 80 yards away when we picked it up. Probably a lucky shot but still that left barrel can reach out and touch them.
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Old 12-06-2018, 09:01 PM   #15
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It depends on what a shooter wants his 16 to do. Here is my take others may see it different.

Clay Targets don’t take many pellets to break and tight chokes deliver adequate density at reasonable distances. Round of Sporting Clays you shoot 100 shots or even more if warming up on 5 Stand first. 125 1 oz cartridges out of a 1 frame Parker 16 takes a toll. 125 3/4 oz cartridges much easier on the shooter, in most cases he will shoot higher scores with the lighter loads. Could be you could shoot the same score with a 20 or 28 but in the SXS tournaments those guns are classed with other 20s and 28s not with 16 G

Hunting small bag limits, few shots, 16 with 1 oz loads gun light and easy to carry is a fine choice.

Ballistic performance one thing Human performance another, guns intended use yet another factor.

Willam
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Old 12-06-2018, 09:04 PM   #16
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Good reasoning William.
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Old 12-06-2018, 09:13 PM   #17
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Default 16's

I love my 16's it's what I started on as a kid in the late 50's. Dad always shot a Br Sweet 16 and so did my brother. I had a BS Savage Fox. Ask the doves and quail I have bagged with my 16's. I just got back fro NM blue quail hunt where my 30" DHE shot the best. My grandson used my 30" VHE to down his turkey last spring. Long may the 16 live and one can never have too many. Thanks Morris for your great shells that we get to use. I like 7/8 oz best.
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Old 12-06-2018, 09:21 PM   #18
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Quote:
Originally Posted by William Davis View Post
It depends on what a shooter wants his 16 to do. Here is my take others may see it different.

Clay Targets donít take many pellets to break and tight chokes deliver adequate density at reasonable distances. Round of Sporting Clays you shoot 100 shots or even more if warming up on 5 Stand first. 125 1 oz cartridges out of a 1 frame Parker 16 takes a toll. 125 3/4 oz cartridges much easier on the shooter, in most cases he will shoot higher scores with the lighter loads. Could be you could shoot the same score with a 20 or 28 but in the SXS tournaments those guns are classed with other 20s and 28s not with 16 G

Hunting small bag limits, few shots, 16 with 1 oz loads gun light and easy to carry is a fine choice.

Ballistic performance one thing Human performance another, guns intended use yet another factor.

Willam
I can buy into that as a reasoning and to each his own, again I am not considering recoil. My thought is wondering if there was a potential advantage of less shot stringing by shooting a less than square shot column. Meaning about the same amount of shot is arriving at the same time like a like a big flat pizza as opposed to a more elongated cloud. Also tight chokes on a 16 gauge was wondering how they would compare to open choke on a 28 gauge.

Guess its all relative.
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Old 12-06-2018, 10:59 PM   #19
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This gun weighed 6.8lbs on a bathroom scale. It didn't seem to kick that much even with the 1oz. loads. For clays I'll stick to 7/8 and 3/4 from RST. I am saving all my empties as I will likely get set up to reload for 16 gauge.

I am looking forward to shooting it some more this weekend
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Old 12-07-2018, 08:41 AM   #20
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I took my 16 hammer on a GA quail hunt back in October. I brought 7/8 oz RST spreader loads and they worked out just fine. Very light recoil and brought the birds down just fine when I did my part. Shooting quail with a hammer gun was challenging and a lot of fun. The light RST shells worked out well over a couple days of hunting. For pheasant, I will go with 1 oz loads.
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