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Polishing for a recut question
Unread 07-06-2020, 06:54 AM   #1
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Default Polishing for a recut question

As part of a restoration, I'm having a recut done. I know normally on a fresh cut everything is polished to 400 grit (or more). For a recut, what level of polishing is required so there is a clean canvas for the engraver, but without removing the engraving he is recutting? Thanks all.
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Unread 07-06-2020, 10:58 AM   #2
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I would start by talking to the engraver .
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Unread 07-06-2020, 11:00 AM   #3
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In order to properly polish it is best for the parts to be annealed (If they were originally case hardened). If not, it will be nearly impossible to be polished and the engraver cannot use normal tools. And if it is going to be case hardened in the end, it should be annealed anyway as part of the process. More modern gun alloys do not require case hardening and can be polished and engraved without annealing (such as Parker Repros for example).

The amount of engraving that is lost due to polishing is wholly dependent on if there is any damage or pitting on the surface that needs to come out. In many cases the issues needing to be worked out are just as deep as the engraving or even deeper. So the engraving must be wiped out in the prepping process.

The original engraving should be documented before any prep is done. Good photographs and maybe even ink/smoke pulls of the engraving are important. That way if anything is lost in prepping, the engraver has a reference to work from.

Normally when I have Gournet do recuts, I document with good photographs and I send them to him by email or printed with the parts and he always gets it right. Sometimes areas of the engraving get completely wiped out where only trace outlines are visible.

Again, the amount removed depends on how much needs to come off to give a good smooth defect free surface. Of course if it is very bad, micro welding can also be utilized to all the defects instead of taking down the surrounding metal.

I personally find that taking the metal to 320 or 400g is acceptable. And carding it with a stainless wheel with oil to blend the scratch marks. Obviously the higher graded gun, the more finely the surfaces should be finished to. But the coverage of the engraving can compensate for that too. When looking at original lower grade guns, it is important to note how many defects were actually left in the surface at the factory. But that is looking at it from a restorative standpoint.

Of course, some engravers may want to do all of the polishing and prep themselves, and they may remove material and recut as they go. But I would bet that most would prefer a ready-to-go canvas if they had a choice.

The ideal situation is if there is no damage to the metal and all you need to do is hit it with some 320 and 400 to shine it up and freshen the surface. But, most guns needing a recut have more damage than that and always need more work then you may think.

See here photos of a Parker CHE that I restored 4-5 years ago showing before and after prep as well as the after photos when the gun came back from Geoffroy by working from photos that I sent him.

Again, this is just what I personally do. It does not mean it is right.

Before 4.jpg

Trigger Plate 1.jpg

Polished 3.jpg

IMG_8875.jpg
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Unread 07-06-2020, 11:04 AM   #4
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Another example on a VH 20g.

This engraving was wiped out completely because the surfaces were so bad.

thumbnail.jpg

IMG_4800.jpeg
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Unread 08-17-2020, 09:37 PM   #5
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Tom,

Here is another example of a GH that I just finished up. The photos below show after I polished all of the pitting and defects out, after engraving recut by Gournet, and finished.

FC8DB344-18F8-4FBF-AAF7-0D871D90661F.jpeg

310657DC-A8D0-4439-BABE-F0CC0B7F04B0.jpeg

4B300DE0-2B03-4C61-956F-C4D524AE161E.jpeg
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Unread 08-18-2020, 10:55 AM   #6
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Thank you Brian!!!

I had Brian do the full Monty on a GH restoration a couple of years ago. He performed the process he has described in this thread for prepping & polishing the metal & having Mr. Gournet recut the engraving as needed.

I learned a big lesson from Brian with this gun. After seeing the results of his process, it was instantly apparent that all of the restorations I had done in the past were only partial inferior jobs. My GH is magnificent and I commend both Brian and Mr. Gournet for the excellence they apply to their craft's.
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