Parker Gun Collectors Association Forums  

Go Back   Parker Gun Collectors Association Forums Parker Forums Parker Restoration

Notices

Reply
Thread Tools Display Modes
Inletting a lock
Unread 06-06-2014, 05:48 AM   #1
Member
Tom
Forum Associate

Member Info
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 142
Thanks: 14
Thanked 30 Times in 19 Posts

Default Inletting a lock

I am trying to inlet a lock, first time at it and it isn't pretty.
Could some one tell me do you strip the lock down to the plate first and fit the plate then add parts ?

I tried the whole lock at once and ended up taking out more wood then I wanted and it still isn't set in there right.
Can anyone recommend a quality book on doing this ?

Thank you, Tom
Virginia Hessler is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-06-2014, 07:20 AM   #2
Member
chris dawe
PGCA Member
 
chris dawe's Avatar

Member Info
 
Join Date: Aug 2010
Posts: 1,053
Thanks: 2,264
Thanked 2,396 Times in 514 Posts

Default

Hi Tom,it's hard to explain like this but I'll give it a whirl ....first you need to strip the action .
Assuming you're starting with a pre-inlet blank

First brush on some transfer medium ie; inletting black ,Prussian blue,you can even use lipstick or a heavy pencil....you just need something that will relay high spots from the metal to the wood.

Start with the main part of the action first ,use light taps with a small plastic or rawhide mallet,just a couple ...remove the metal,and scrape away the transfer marks left by your inletting black (etc ).

When that's done I like to use a 5/8 inch wood screw through the top tang screw hole to hold everything in place,some use clamps .

Then move on to the trigger plate ( stripped ) same process, only this will use the action as a reference point ,keep inletting until the trigger plate is flush in the action ,then drill the two main action screws...you may have to inlet a little more for the rear screw until it fits flush in the top rear tang .

Now you,reassemble the top lever and lock bolt,cover with inletting black ,and fit into the stock like the rest ,and don't stop until you can push the lever all the way to the right ,

Re-install the safety and spring ,and inlet the same .

Now the sears ,same as the rest .

Re-install the triggers and carry on inletting those .

And the best for last ,the safety jacket ,this has to be done just so or nothing will work ,don't forget to drill for the little push rod that engages the "automatic" safety.
Use the old stock as a reference all throughout out the inletting process,but especially for the safety jacket .

If you make it through all that the grip cap and buttplate should be a breeze,just remember to cut a rough notch for the peak on the plate first and go from there ...use inletting black for these as well.


I'm positive this is all clear as mud.
This will differ from any "woodworking " you may have done in the past,its a very,very slow process, and requires your full concentration ,any rushing about will result a mistakes plain and simple ,try to think a couple steps ahead as you go .There's nothing wrong with a do it yourself attitude ,its how I started at 10 years old with my Daisy BB gun,here I am thirty years later still make stocks ,lots of sawdust and even mistakes .

I should add I assumed you would be starting from pre-inlet as it would give you a fighting chance ,straight from lumber would involve a few more crucial steps in layout .

I hope this helped,good luck with it .

Chris
chris dawe is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-06-2014, 08:04 AM   #3
Member
OH Osthaus
PGCA Lifetime
Member
 
Rick Losey's Avatar

Member Info
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Posts: 6,981
Thanks: 1,218
Thanked 6,500 Times in 2,748 Posts

Default

get yourself a good muzzleloader building book - such as Peter Alexanders

http://grenvillegunsmith.blogspot.com/

the process is the same since a flintlock is a side lock- Peter is in the process of putting out a dvd set off instructions.
one og my builds I can post later, but as Chris says - start with the plate and build up as you go, check the squareness of the plate to the bottom often.
__________________
"If there is a heaven it must have thinning aspen gold, and flighting woodcock, and a bird dog" GBE
Rick Losey is online now   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-06-2014, 09:43 AM   #4
Member
Tom
Forum Associate

Member Info
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 142
Thanks: 14
Thanked 30 Times in 19 Posts

Default

Thanks guys
This is for a lifter gun and I haven't been able to find a pre inlet stock for it so I'm going to give it a go. At this point I am just learning how to inlet on an old stock so I don't hack up a nice piece of wood. I did order some inletting paste from Brownells but it hasn't arrived. The action and trigger plate went on pretty good but the lock is giving me a hard time. I am trying not to just hack out a bunch of wood behind it until it fits in, but I am finding it difficult to figure out where each part is exactly and just cut out for it.
My thought is strip the plate and inlet that and add each piece inletting as I go. I must admit taking out all those tiny screws and springs that have been happy sitting there for the last 100 years makes me a little nervous. Is that a good plan or is it an over kill ?
Thanks again for the info, Tom
Virginia Hessler is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-06-2014, 09:44 AM   #5
Member
William Davis
PGCA Member

Member Info
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Posts: 1,016
Thanks: 108
Thanked 622 Times in 343 Posts

Default

Further to the muzzloading advice.

My first lock inlets were Dixie gun works M/L Shotgun locks. It would be worthwhile to go to somebody like Dixie buy a lock and work out your inleting on something thats not expensive or important. I still have that first muzzleloader built from Dixie parts in high school shop 1964. It's pretty rough, did not think so at the time. You may be better first time than I was.

Not many parts in a simple M/L lock not as hard to take apart and put back together. I always start with the plate and add parts cutting for each as I go.

Bill
William Davis is offline   Reply With Quote
Unread 06-06-2014, 08:54 PM   #6
Member
B. Dudley
PGCA Lifetime
Member
 
Brian Dudley's Avatar

Member Info
 
Join Date: Aug 2011
Posts: 8,187
Thanks: 359
Thanked 10,828 Times in 3,085 Posts

Default

Tom,
Break down the lock plate completely. Inlet the plate itself first. Then screw the bride onto the plate and do that. Then the rest of the parts will follow. It is done in stages.

You want to do both lock plates first so you can then drill the cross screw hole and install the screw. If you are reusing the original screw. You will want to make sure you Inet each lock to the point where the screw is timed and the end of the screw is flush with the opposing plate.
__________________
B. Dudley
Brian Dudley is offline   Reply With Quote
Visit Brian Dudley's homepage!
Unread 06-06-2014, 09:21 PM   #7
Member
Tom
Forum Associate

Member Info
 
Join Date: Feb 2014
Posts: 142
Thanks: 14
Thanked 30 Times in 19 Posts

Default

Ok I think I got it.
On the second plate I striped it and it went in way easier. I just bolted on the bridge and inlet that, way easier and neater.
Thanks guys, I'm on my way. Tom
Virginia Hessler is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off

Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 07:15 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 1998 - 2020, Parkerguns.org
Copyright 2004 Design par Megatekno
- 2008 style update 3.7 avec l'autorisation de son auteur par Stradfred.