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Unread 12-01-2019, 08:58 AM   #21
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Originally Posted by Jay Gardner View Post
I assume there was crud built up in the checkering. What did you use to clean the checkering and how did you do it?
There wasn't much crud built up in the checkering but I used a nylon bristle brush similar to a toothbrush to make sure the Timberlux didn't pool up and fill in the checkering. That scrubbing action with the Timerlux may have loosened and removed any small amount of crud that was there.
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Unread 12-01-2019, 11:00 AM   #22
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To answer your question Dean, we used it more than 40 years ago on a Winchester lever gun. The stock on that gun was filthy from storage and had oil in the wrist. We used a flannel cloth and straight Woolite beginning in the wrist. I know the purchaser of that gun was pleased with the wood. In addition, I don't see any sense in applying material on a stock without removing the offensive material first. Frankly, 40 years ago Timberlux was not even created yet and we were able to produce very acceptable results with $.20 worth of Woolite.
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Unread 12-07-2019, 09:50 AM   #23
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I don't see any sense in applying material on a stock without removing the offensive material first. Frankly, 40 years ago Timberlux was not even created yet and we were able to produce very acceptable results with $.20 worth of Woolite.
I agree that the "offensive material" needs to be removed -- BUT I didn't want to "refinish" the stock. By "refinish" I mean strip off all of the original finish down to the bare wood. I wanted to retain the original finish but clean it up. The wood was so dark, either from 140 years of dirt gradually getting rubbed into the finish, or just built up patina from being in the attic for that long. I thought that Timberlux would do that and was surprised to read the instructions and find that all you do is apply it over the existing finish. But it did lighten the wood and bring out the grain without me cleaning the wood in any way.

I'd like to see the results of a stock cleaned with woolite -- sounds interesting. I wouldn't want to try it on a stock still on the gun though -- I think there is a chance the caustic ingredients might rust the metal. Removing the wood from two 140 year old shotguns for a simple cleaning is more work than I wanted to do.
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Unread 12-07-2019, 11:11 AM   #24
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Ron, admittedly removing Winchester wood is easier than removing Parker wood but, I wouldn't recommend cleaning the wood without removing the wood from the frame first. Since the laundry room was adjacent to the workbench we chose Woolite as the mildest SOAP available. Johnsons Baby shampoo or a dish washing soap without any detergents maybe a better choice, however, do not mix water with the soap you choose as that will raise the grain where the finish is worn away. Since you already committed to Timberlux I would wait a year and if you are still dissatisfied make a choice on your next approach.
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Unread 12-07-2019, 04:21 PM   #25
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I just purchased a D grade top lever hammer gun 10ga #4 frame with a very worn black stock. I cleaned it with acetone by wiping it down with paper towels. Then a few coats of timberlux and the grain and color appeared. It's now protected from moisture and doesn't look refinished yet some nice color and grain is apparent.
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Unread 12-07-2019, 05:15 PM   #26
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I strongly advise against murphys oil soap. Only because I have seen and heard of very drastic results both ways with it. Not worth taking the chance in my opinion.
Austin Hogan recommended it in the PP and I have used it with great results.
Guess Austin and me didn't know better. Sorry for the imput
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Unread 12-16-2019, 12:19 AM   #27
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Eric,
I only say that because I have seen varied results. Including removal of remaining original finish completely. Whatever had worked for others is just fine of course. It is just my thought on the matter.
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Old dirty stock
Unread 12-18-2019, 12:11 PM   #28
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Default Old dirty stock

And then there's the other old way.
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Unread 12-18-2019, 12:17 PM   #29
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Very nice Larry.

What is the “other old way”?





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Old dirty stock
Unread 12-18-2019, 01:48 PM   #30
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Default Old dirty stock

Refinishing of course. I know that is not something that he wanted to do, but you really don't know what's under there until you take a look. And the right guy doing it can keep the character of the old wood without making it look new.
Either way I can't wait to see the results. Good luck with the project and please keep us informed.
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