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Unread 07-15-2019, 06:28 PM   #41
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Bruce Day
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Sherman Bell’s factually based article makes much sense .

My friend Larry Potterfield sells gunsmithing equipment . Quite successfully .
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Unread 07-15-2019, 07:30 PM   #42
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Midway is good at selling tools. Turn a reamer with a tap wrench barrel held in a vise = bubba gunsmith.

https://youtu.be/l6yrnJIyjtU

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Unread 07-15-2019, 11:37 PM   #43
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Quote:
Originally Posted by William Davis View Post
Midway is good at selling tools. Turn a reamer with a tap wrench barrel held in a vise = bubba gunsmith.

https://youtu.be/l6yrnJIyjtU

William
Larry is no bubba gunsmith -- bubba gunsmith holds the barrels in one hand a dremel tool in the other.

A piloted reamer turned by hand can be a very precise way to lengthen a chamber or open a choke -- not withstanding the question of whether or not you should do it in the first place
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Unread 07-16-2019, 12:07 AM   #44
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A choke reamer that passes completely out through the muzzle tells me one thing...





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Unread 07-16-2019, 12:23 AM   #45
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Problem with that reamer set up it indexes with a bushing on the inside of a barrel that was bent to regulate. Depending on a possibly crooked tube to run the reamer straight is a recipe for muzzles not concentric. Some barrels may be straight others bent a fair amount to regulate. Your eye can see a thousandth or two out of round on the reamed muzzle easily.

No good rifle-smith would ream chambers without dialing in the barrel true from the inside on a bushed rod checked both inboard and outboard of the lathes headstock. Then running the reamer in the lathes tailstock that’s perfectly in line with the bore. May well turn the finish reamer by hand with the lathe out of gear, its still held in perfect alignment.

Shotgun muzzle no different than a rifle chamber except a factory machine made single barrel is usually straight and no regulation issues to consider. Hand regulated double very different situation .

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Unread 07-16-2019, 08:06 AM   #46
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Aside from the fact that we've been discussing chambers not chokes here's a quote from a fairly well respected shotgun smith Mike Orlen:

"To lengthen a chamber and/or a chamber forcing cone by hand, you will first need to secure the barrel in a bench vise. I like to use a couple of pieces of 2- by 4-inch lumber and an old shot bag to pad the vise. Make sure the barrel is held very tightly in your vise because there is a great amount of torque exerted during this operation.

"With a well oiled and sharp long forcing cone reamer, begin cutting your new chamber by turning the tool clockwise. You will be amazed at how quickly a sharpened tool begins to remove material. After cutting no more than 3/8 inch, remove your reamer, brush off the chips, push a patch through the bore, re-oil, and resume cutting. Always rotate the reamer in a clockwise direction—even when removing it from the bore."

The entire article can be found here:

https://www.gun-tests.com/special_re...l#.XS2tI-hKi70
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Unread 07-16-2019, 08:14 AM   #47
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I'll just buy a gun in good shape that is original, and shoot light loads of the size shell for which it was intended...and continue to read these discussions with interest.

I know for folks new to shooting old doubles things can be confusing at times, and there's a tendency to want succinct answers to straightforward questions. As I used to tell my students: for real life questions there is no answer "in the back of the book," you have to do your own thinking and research and solve the problem yourself.
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Unread 07-16-2019, 09:03 AM   #48
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Ronald Scott View Post
Aside from the fact that we've been discussing chambers not chokes here's a quote from a fairly well respected shotgun smith Mike Orlen:

"To lengthen a chamber and/or a chamber forcing cone by hand, you will first need to secure the barrel in a bench vise. I like to use a couple of pieces of 2- by 4-inch lumber and an old shot bag to pad the vise. Make sure the barrel is held very tightly in your vise because there is a great amount of torque exerted during this operation.

"With a well oiled and sharp long forcing cone reamer, begin cutting your new chamber by turning the tool clockwise. You will be amazed at how quickly a sharpened tool begins to remove material. After cutting no more than 3/8 inch, remove your reamer, brush off the chips, push a patch through the bore, re-oil, and resume cutting. Always rotate the reamer in a clockwise direction—even when removing it from the bore."

The entire article can be found here:

https://www.gun-tests.com/special_re...l#.XS2tI-hKi70

I’ll begin by saying that I like Mike Orlen and have been to his home and workshop and have had him do some barrel work for me and for other friends, and he does good work.

Nowhere in his article on chamber and forcing cone lengthening does he ever address barrel wall thickness. He only says that chambers should never be lengthened on Damascus or Twist barrels - he simply mimics the warning that is printed on shotgun ammunition boxes. This is added simply as a guard against liability claims... heck, even RST prints their classic shotshell boxes with this warning. We all know this is all bovine excrement as long as Damascus, Twist, and even ‘fluid steel’ barrels are sound and of sufficient wall thickness in the critical area of the juncture where the front of the chamber begins the forcing cone.

Come on Mike, you can do better....





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Not because I think they're better than the other breeds,
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Unread 07-16-2019, 09:18 AM   #49
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Looked at the link, while he mentions hand reaming most of the article and photos are about proper set up in a lathe. Not mentioned is dialing in the barrel true or measuring thickness were the chamber will be altered. No doubt in my mind he does the work properly with careful consideration to the individual barrels ability to be altered safely . Likely some editor cut parts out of his article and insisted he speaks to the home mechanic.

Don’t think for a minute Mike Orlean is using Plumbers methods to alter chambers and chokes. On the other hand the Midway video is showing how to ruin a double in order to sell tools.

Leave the barrel work to experienced double gunsmith, price of a blotched job, value, function, or safety, on a Parker too high. Even better stay with appropriate ammunition don’t make the gun fit the shell.

William
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Unread 07-16-2019, 09:53 AM   #50
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Quote:
Originally Posted by William Davis View Post
Likely some editor cut parts out of his article and insisted he speaks to the home mechanic.

William

Hey - hey, hey.... whadda ya talkin' about?





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