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Unread 04-09-2021, 04:05 PM   #11
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Eric Estes
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Used ones do show up on ebay or even this site from time to time. Although even if you get the frame size to match it can be crap shoot if they will fit. May be worth looking. I have gotten lucky this way twice. Both cases some fitting was needed, but in the end it worked for a tiny fraction of new. Making my own from a blank is beyond my skills or patience.
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Unread 06-08-2021, 10:19 PM   #12
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I had Lawrence DelGrego restock my grandfathers/my Dad's 16 ga VH about 5 or 6 yrs ago and the cost was around $3k as I recall.
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Unread 06-08-2021, 11:22 PM   #13
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Mike Poindexter
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I have seen worse successfully repaired by milling out the interior and fitting a piece of marine plywood into the gap, then milling and fitting the necessary slots into the now solid piece of wood. I would give Dennis Earl Smith a call (the Stock Doctor) in Oregon and see what he thinks. If he says no, then I am out of suggestions.
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Unread 06-09-2021, 06:16 AM   #14
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Aaron Beck
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I believe Brian's point was not that it couldnt be repaired, just that its not worth the time vs restocking. I have just been through this with a stock that was in better (but not much better) shape. I learned a lot and enjoyed some cabin fever relief but the time involved was sobering and Ive learned i might have been better off restocking from a duplicated blank. If the repair doesnt hold, ill really be kicking myself.
Regarding a new stock, If youre looking for a gun to use, consider the value of a custom fit stock. You may never recoup the cost in dollars from a collector but that doesnt mean its not worth it ever.
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Unread 06-09-2021, 02:20 PM   #15
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Thank you for all the advise guys.

Aaron I took his post the exact same way. I'm itching to learn so my current plan is two fold.

Find a semi-inletted stock and try to fit that myself. If you know of one please let me know. Only thing I can find so far is one from Malcolm gun works, which seems to have pretty bad reviews.

The old stock has been in and out of lacquer baths for around a month now, and it's showing a few more cracks but cleaning up all the years of gunk. The idea is to do something link Mike mentioned, fit some wood into the gap then refit the stock. I'm looking at glass bedding it if possible. I'm pretty new to this so it's more research now than anything.

This was bought as a learning gun so I have to learn something, even if it's when to throw in the towel haha.
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Unread 06-09-2021, 03:58 PM   #16
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You could also fix the original stock enough to send out and have duplicated, which could get you experience on both fronts.

My stock was not split but despite this it spread after drying from repeated acetone soaks.
so i repaired it with some epoxy and more wood and a stainless staple. I intended to write an after action report about it so here goes.
I didnt find the "quart jar of acetone" method useful at all, the soluble oil wicked up the stock and left and ugly line at the surface of the jar. Perhaps this would sand out but I switched to full immersion/
I used a combination of west systems 105/ resin and west systems Gflex which is alleged to be able to bond across blush for secondary glue ups. The g flex is pretty thick and i used that as a bedding material, its worth noting that it thins out some as it cures due to the heat created by the chemical process so plan your bedding and release agent accordingly. You can mix the two types of west system to blend characteristics and use fillers too.

Mineral oil on the metal as a release agent

I also cant say enough about the utility of surgical tubing for clamping on the stock head and wrist. Got it from mcmaster carr/

Also from Mcmaster were some handy glue applicators and syringes which proved less useful. The epoxy wouldnt flow through the needle even when the pot was new and any reapplications later before cure, forget it. So I ended up using some no 3 round artist paintbrushes to apply epoxy and found you can drip it into a pretty fine crack without making a mess. capillary action plus flexing the joint will do most of the work and you can clean the brush with acetone for the next glue up. I took it in many stages using the primary or secondary epoxy as needed.
If you wet out the surfaces when the pot is new you can add thicker glue later in the pot either on top to replace sag or as a bedding right before assembly.

Thats pretty much the feedback. Many of the methods I read about here or on the lc smith website. Lots of good info and very grateful to learn from those who have tried these things before.
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Unread 06-10-2021, 03:12 PM   #17
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Aaron Beck View Post
You could also fix the original stock enough to send out and have duplicated, which could get you experience on both fronts.
Thank you for the great reply, it's tremendously helpful.

I agree 100% the jar soaking the head didn't work. I have the same line halfway up my stock. I'm doing full lacquer soaks now. I might pickup more acetone and do a full soak with that also.

I've attached a picture of its current state. Yes that is a nail sticking through the side, 1 of three I found so far!

Once I get done soaking it the plan is to pull all the nails, chisel/flatten the sides where the nails where and embed a new piece of wood between sides. I do plan on doing the staple trick as well. After all that I'm going to use west systems or acraglas to bed the whole area.

I figure doing all this will give me time to find a good semi inletted or replacement stock.
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