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Unread 01-24-2019, 06:10 AM   #11
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John Davis
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1 oz. or 1 1/8 oz., 2 3/4 drams equivalent. 1145 to 1180 fps. That's all you need for 16 yard singles or handicap out to 23-24 yards.
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Unread 01-24-2019, 07:16 AM   #12
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So Gary, can you post a copy of the letter and a picture of the new recoil pad?
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Unread 01-24-2019, 07:17 AM   #13
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You can use any of the commercial trap or target loads. No need to shoot anything heavy but the gun will probably take them, depending on itís condition. The vast majority of SBTís we see have been pretty well taken care of.





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Unread 01-24-2019, 09:32 AM   #14
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High and low brass does not mean a thing.

That gun should be able to digest any 2-3/4Ē target load that you want to shoot.
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Unread 01-24-2019, 10:34 AM   #15
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Lost track of this post, sorry. Here is the letter and some additional information that I appreciate.
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Unread 01-24-2019, 12:45 PM   #16
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You, or someone, put a great pad on your gun. My first SC, 1917 gun, has a Griffin and Howe repro Silver pad. It looks like you may have the same pad, but more likely an original Silver. Beautiful. Some day, I will put a leather face on mine. The owner of your gun was an over the top professional, with higher averages than the best shooters in Washington at the time, names left out until I can confirm the spelling. I am not able to determine for whom Reid shot, could be Parker since W.F. Parker ordered his gun. I will post the shooting records for Reid in a later post. What a great gun with great provenance.
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Unread 01-24-2019, 01:04 PM   #17
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OK, here goes. Your shooter, L.H. Reid, shot on both sides of the purchase of the gun, I haven't determined how far before and how far after. Every year I researched, he was listed as a professional.

1916, shot 2740, broke 2603. 95.07 average

1917, shot 3460, broke 3364. 97.22 average

1918, shot 2130, broke 2079. 95.72 average

1920, shot 3920, broke 3747. 94.86 average

In 1914, Mr. Reid was high average professional in the country with a 96.44. I can't say much more than that. Your gun was in good hands. The next step is to find out who he shot for. My 1922 book shows his address, which I will post later.
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Unread 01-24-2019, 10:11 PM   #18
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Thank you all for the info
Need to find me some range time for it
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Unread 01-31-2019, 11:18 PM   #19
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[QUOTE=Brian Dudley;263801]High and low brass does not mean a thing.

It actually does mean something to those of us who have been hunting for more than 50 years or so. High brass shells were those heavy hunting loads manufactured by the various loading companies. A heavy 12 bore load, with the high brass typical of these cartridges, generally were loaded with 1 1/4 oz. of shot and 3 3/4 drams equivalent or, as is currently defined, a load of 1300+ fps. A typical low brass 12 bore load had a shorter brass base and was generally loaded with an ounce or 1 1/8 oz. of shot at 3 drams equivalent or about 1200 fps.

Hence, the term high and low brass accurately defined what one could expect from factory cartridges with respect to the loading. Itís a general term, but is somewhat useful when referring to factory loaded shells. I load all my own shells, but I would imagine that even today, if I bought a box of Remington Express shotshells, I would find that they were loaded in high brass cases. Conversely, if I bought a box of target loads, Iím sure the shells would have low brass.

Higher brass is no longer needed for maximum loads since plastic and stronger cases have eliminated the need to add to the strength of maximum loaded cases. From a marketing perspective, I donít believe weíll see the elimination of higher brass on heavy factory loads any time soon.
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Unread 02-04-2019, 10:21 AM   #20
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ATA rules in the early days allowed 1 1/4 ounces of shot. I don't know when that changed to 1 1/8 ounces, but a 1917 Parker single obviously digested thousands of rounds of 1 1/4 ounce loads without significant damage. My 1922 PHE trap gun was used on pigeons until I purchased it. It had probably shot almost nothing other than 1 1/4 ounce loads for its entire life until the 1990s when I purchased it. It is still very tight and on face. By the way, the earliest NSSA rule books allowed 1 1/4 ounce loads for skeet competition. Fortunately, that didn't last long.
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