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Old 05-28-2018, 06:30 PM   #61
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Tom, it's an attached file in the post above my barrels picture. I'll look at your tutorial again. Thanks.
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Old 05-28-2018, 06:46 PM   #62
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Thanks. Read it. I am going to try not etching until the end and use a stronger, less diluted Ferric Chloride. I will watch the barrels, doing them in a tank, rubbing the barrels with protected hands, and then remove them at just the right moment. Then I'll quickly wash them down with baking soda. That's the plan. But I have to be careful. Etching will remove metal if the barrels are in the solution too long. That's why I am going to do the etching in an open tank so that I can watch and remove at just the right moment. That's the plan. We'll see how it works out.
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Old 05-30-2018, 08:17 AM   #63
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Hey guys what a great thread! So I have a quick question I have a set of Damascus barrels, there is some color to them, but I would like to get it darker, but dont have the set up for a full refinish. Is there any quick and easy way to get some color back to the barrels without having to go through the refinishing process?
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Old 05-30-2018, 08:35 AM   #64
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Rick, I watched gunsmith restoring an English shotgun with Damascus barrels. The barrels weren't that bad so he placed them in a tank. I tried to understand what the fluid was, but couldn't understand him. I'll try to find it and watch again. I was fascinated, but for the life of me I couldn't quite catch it.

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Old 05-30-2018, 08:51 AM   #65
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I found it! The video is about the restoration of a W.W. Greener. This is part 4. The talk fo the fluid he uses starts at the 12 minute mark. Please help me understand what he is saying.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=L6pAYitBgMg
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Old 05-30-2018, 08:56 AM   #66
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I think he said, sulfuric acid then iron sulphate in water.
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Old 05-31-2018, 04:43 PM   #67
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Tom Flanigan View Post
barrels when they left Parker were true black and not a dark gray. I have gotten there with a couple of barrels but I can't do it consistently and that's my problem. I can't seem to get over the hump with most barrels.
Same problem, Tom. On this Lefever set, I didn't use logwood. I don't really want to use logwood. The problem is, I don't know precisely how this success was achieved. What made the difference? Don't know, and haven't had the same result quality since. That said, the process on this set was loosely as follows: rusting to the point of zero visible pattern, a lengthy dunk in the etchant, back to rusting until the pattern is gone again, and another dunk. I believe it was a total of three iterations of those two steps. Some of crolle' was filled quite well, which helps it look more black, and some was still thin. I had to stop at this for fear of wrecking the whole thing and having to start over.

That said, the bigger problem I am having is with the application of the rusting solution, and it building up too thickly on the barrels alongside the top rib. I am carding that area just as aggressively as the rest, but the oxide it too thick, even though I strive to be careful not to over-apply. I suspect that in my efforts to coat the barrel, and the rib sides completely, the problem is created regardless. If it weren't for that, my results would be much more consistent.

Lastly, I like carding with a very thin baking soda slurry, but have been trying a similar slurry of Bon-ami, which seems less abrasive.
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Old 05-31-2018, 04:56 PM   #68
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I will add: I've tried Dale's repeated brownings until a strong contrast develops technique. I have never had a strong contrast develop. As stated earlier, I don't have logwood in the process. When I decide to boil (I use a steam system), the barrels are completely black; no pattern developed during browning, so no pattern was present after converting the rust.

I don't see how the carding between brownings takes off the rust on the steel but leaves it on the iron, unless the pre-etch makes that possible. There is a good bit of debate about pre-etching being worth it or not. I could be wrong, but I thought that Dr. Gaddy abandoned pre-etching.
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Old 05-31-2018, 04:56 PM   #69
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Bill....I just formally retired today and so I plan to spend a lot of time refining my technique. I can pretty much dedicate myself to it till I get some answers. I am seeking a consistent, repeatable process that can be used for all barrels and that will provide consistent true black and white. I'm sure Parker didn't play with different methods for different barrels. I believe they used one process to get consistent results. They couldn't afford to do otherwise. Investigation continues......
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Old 05-31-2018, 05:02 PM   #70
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Congratulations Tom!

I am stuck with my investigations being late at night. IBM gets the days, family on the weekends, church on Sunday. I'll keep at it, take better notes, and pass on to the group here anything to seems to be worth considering.

Hey, when are we going to start talking about those unfortunate barrels that have voids in the solder? I understand that some turn those barrels away until they are fixed properly. I don't think that's always reasonable for some, but protecting ones self from trapped fluids (including etchant) weeping on otherwise good work is certainly a challenge.

Maybe this kind of device would help?
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