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Unread 08-12-2019, 10:44 PM   #21
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Incidentally there was a fine old gentleman at the Shennendale club years ago by the name of Dick Smith if my memory is correct . He got a very lovely 3200 1-1000 skeet that was NIB or LNIB and sent it to Briley or Kolar and had it tubed . We were all at a skeet shoot somewhere in VA (30 years ago) and Mr. Smith looked at his new gun and noticed the 3200 crack in the tang area and it was a bit more acute then most . He showed it to another Shennendale member that was a decent shotgun smith . They took it apart right then Tom tested it and it split . The following weekend we were at another shoot I asked Dick about his gun and he promptly pulled it from its case and it looked good as new Tom Moore had glued etc and you couldn’t tell it ever cracked !
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Unread 08-12-2019, 10:57 PM   #22
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If I have posted this before, I apologize. My dad was a director at Remington who ordered a 2 Barrel 3200 set in the years before choke tubes. The gun took a long time to arrive, and when it did there was no invoice for him to pay. He called the president asked where the invoice was. The president said to my dad that they could not sell him the gun at the present time, because it was on their books for $300,000. They claimed that that was the work done to be able to develop their multiple Barrel skeet sets on their automated Machinery without requiring additional skilled labor to fit the barrels. After two years they sent my dad an invoice for the normal amount for the gun. If that $300,000 number is correct, which I doubt, the few number of multiple Barrel skeet sets that Remington must have sold would have been big-time losers.
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Unread 08-13-2019, 12:07 AM   #23
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Quote:
Originally Posted by John Dallas View Post
If I have posted this before, I apologize. My dad was a director at Remington who ordered a 2 Barrel 3200 set in the years before choke tubes. The gun took a long time to arrive, and when it did there was no invoice for him to pay. He called the president asked where the invoice was. The president said to my dad that they could not sell him the gun at the present time, because it was on their books for $300,000. They claimed that that was the work done to be able to develop their multiple Barrel skeet sets on their automated Machinery without requiring additional skilled labor to fit the barrels. After two years they sent my dad an invoice for the normal amount for the gun. If that $300,000 number is correct, which I doubt, the few number of multiple Barrel skeet sets that Remington must have sold would have been big-time losers.
I was “told” that Remington made 12 gauge barrels (obviously) and 20 gauge barrels for the 3200’s but somewhere along the line “I think” I was told the 28 and 410 3200 barrels were made by Simmons . Dunno if that’s correct but seems to me that was what I’d heard .
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Unread 08-13-2019, 10:54 AM   #24
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I shoot an original TC grade M 32 with 2 sets of barrels, one 30 inch bored .018 in the lower barrel; .034 in the upper for trap. The second set is 28 inch bored .012 and .020. The gun is heavier than any of the Browning Superposeds I ever owned and shot on trap by almost a pound, and is not nearly as lively or dynamic in handling qualities compared to them, but is is a stone killer at any yardage and the added weight dampens recoil significantly.

Our own Researcher (Dave Noreen) posted a wonderful brief history and pricing breakdown of the M 32 back in 2003 I think it was, but I don't remember the BBS (Shotgun World? Trapshooters.com??).

FWIW - Larry Del Grego & Son routinely service and repair M 32 Remingtons and, as in the case of Parker Guns, have an extensive parts inventory for them. (Seldom if ever depleted since hardly anything ever goes wrong with them, except when the rabid trapshooters start "working on" the single trigger setup).
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Unread 08-13-2019, 02:05 PM   #25
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Me thinks Kevin was thinking of this --

Remington Model 3200 -- The Model 3200 was introduced in a special fold-out center spread in the 1973 Remington catalogue, in Field ($450), Skeet ($470), Trap ($490), Special Trap ($540), and One of 1000 Trap ($1050).

The 1974 Remington catalogue had the one of 1000 Skeet offered in either 26” or 28” barrels offered at $1050. Prices were up across the board – Field $485, Skeet $530, Trap $550, Special Trap $600. April 1, 1974, prices up again -- Field $530, Skeet $560, Trap $595, Special Trap $645, one of 1000 Skeet $1150. On July 1, 1974, prices were up again -- Field $555, Skeet $590, Trap $625, Special Trap $680, one of 1000 Skeet $1150.

The 1975 Remington catalogue introduces the 3" Magnum, order nos. 3241 (30" full/full) and 3243 (30" mod./full) as being available June 1, 1975. List price was $620, a $25 premium over the $595 Field Grade.

In the 1976 Remington catalogue the Special Trap is gone and the Competition Trap ($865) and Competition Skeet ($835) are introduced. Also the choice of RK-W or Satin finish is beginning to appear. The Field Grade had increased $100 to $695, the 3" Magnum to $720, and the Skeet to $735.

In the 1977 Remington catalogue 32-inch barrels appear for the various Trap versions and prices are up again. Field $750, 3" Magnum $775, Skeet $795, Trap $795, Competition Skeet $950, Competition Trap $950, and the Special Trap is back, now at $850.

By the 1978 Remington catalogue there are only four basic offerings for the Model 3200 -- Skeet, Special Trap, Competition Trap and Competition Skeet. I don't have any price lists from 1978 on.

For the 1979 Remington catalogue the only change is the addition of the (New) 28" Imp. Mod./Full (Live Bird Gun) in the competition Skeet Satin Finish column.

New for the 1980 Remington catalogue we have the addition of the Skeet set, 20- and 28-gauge and .410-bore skeet barrels and a luggage case (order No. 3299) to a 28-inch Competition Skeet Gun (order No. 3237). Also, the number of barrel length and choke combinations on the various Trap guns is reduced.

No changes in the 1981 Remington catalogue.

In the 1982 Remington catalogue the Skeet and the Special Trap are gone, as are 26-inch Competition Skeet guns. The Competition Trap choices are down to 32" Imp. Mod./Full, 30" Imp. Mod./Full and 30-inch Full/Full, all three either with regular or Monte Carlo stock.

In the 1983 Remington catalogue the Model 3200 isn't even pictured but down in the bottom right corner of page 15 the same six variants of the Competition Trap, the one 28-inch Competition Skeet, the Skeet set, and now in the Competition Skeet column order no. 3207 is listed as 28" Imp. Mod./Full (Pigeon Gun).

The Model 3200 is gone entirely from the 1984 Remington catalogue.
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Unread 08-13-2019, 03:59 PM   #26
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WOW - I can’t imagine how you ever earned the moniker “Reseacher”





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Unread 08-13-2019, 04:57 PM   #27
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No Dave; actually it was this - hope its not under copyright!! (Still can't find the BBS I downloaded & copied it from). That notwithstanding, lots of useful info here (as usual) - thanks!!!!


"The first catalogue I have that shows the No. 32 is the undated pocket catalogue of about 1932 or 3, pre DuPont. It shows the double trigger No. 32A with 30-inch plain barrels as standard and 28- or 32-inch barrels to order. The double triggered No. 32 TC "Target" grade had 28-, 30- or 32-inch vent rib barrels. The third offering was the No. 32S "Trap Special" grade with 28-, 30-, or 32-inch solid rib barrels. This catalogue states "Eventually we will have a single trigger for these guns but for the time being double triggers will be supplied. Later the single trigger can be fitted at a moderate extra charge."

According to the 1938 Dealer's Price List the No. 32A "Standard" Grade had a wholesale price of $100.80 and a retail price of $126. A raised solid rib was $6/$8. Extra barrels were $52.50/$60. The choice of barrel lengths was 26-, 28-, or 30-inch with choice of boring -- full, modified, improved cylinder or cylinder. Higher grades were the No. 32D "Tournament" grade for $232.50/$276.50; No. 32E "Expert" grade for $276.25/$326.50; and the No. 32F "Premier" grade for $350.60/$411.50. Grip style and stock dimensions to order on the higher grades, $13.10/$15.00 extra on the No. 32A.

The Trap gun was the No. 32TC "Target" grade for $123.35/$154.90 with 30- or 32-inch vent rib barrels. An extra set of vent rib barrels for the No. 32TC was $67.80/$80.40.

The No. 32 "Skeet" grade came with 26- or 28-inch barrels with "Remington Special Skeet boring." With a plain barrel $103.40/$129; with solid rib barrels $109.40/$137; and with vent rib barrels $118.70/$149.40.

All the No. 32s were offered in 12-gauge only. The only gun that regularly came with a pad was the No. 32TC, which is shown with a Hawkins with the heart-shaped holes. A recoil pad was $4.65/$5.50 extra on any Remington gun.

The No. 32 offerings in 1939 were the same, and by January 2, 1942, the offerings were still the same but prices were up sharply. In the 1947 catalogue the No. 32s are pictured but overstamped "Not Available in 1947."
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Unread 08-13-2019, 08:51 PM   #28
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The 28" barrels on the 3200 actually measure 27 1/2".
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Unread 08-13-2019, 11:06 PM   #29
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My paper collection has filled in since I wrote that brief bit on the Model 32s.

Here it is ad nauseum --

Model 32 -- The first catalogue I have that shows the No. 32 is the undated pocket catalogue of about 1932 or 3, pre DuPont. It shows the double trigger No. 32A with 30-inch plain barrels as standard and 28- or 32-inch barrels to order. The double triggered No. 32 TC "Target" grade had 28-, 30- or 32-inch vent rib barrels. The third offering was the No. 32S "Trap Special" grade with 28-, 30-, or 32-inch solid rib barrels. This catalogue states "Eventually we will have a single trigger for these guns but for the time being double triggers will be supplied. Later the single trigger can be fitted at a moderate extra charge."

The August 12, 1933, Remington Arms Co., Inc. Retail Catalog showed all the Model 32s with double triggers. It offered the No. 32A “Standard” Grade for $82.50. The No. 32D “Tournament” Grade was $250, The No. 32E “Expert” Grade was $300 and the No. 32F “Premier” Grade was $385. A raised solid rib was $8 extra and a ventilated rib was $20.40 extra. The trap guns were the No. 32TC “Target” Grade with vent rib for $110 and the No. 32S “Trap Special” with raised solid rib for $97.50.

The March 1, 1934, Remington Arms Co., Inc. Retail Catalog offered the No. 32A “Standard” Grade with double triggers for $78.40, with the Remington Selective Single Trigger $16.50 extra. The No. 32D “Tournament” Grade was $250, The No. 32E “Expert” Grade was $300 and the No. 32F “Premier” Grade was $385. A raised solid rib was $8 extra, a ventilated rib was $20.40 extra and a Beaver Tail Fore-end was $3 extra. The trap guns remained the No. 32TC “Target” Grade with vent rib for $104.30 with double triggers & $123.80 with the Remington Selective Single Trigger and the No. 32S “Trap Special” with raised solid rib for $91.90 with double triggers & $101.40 with the Remington Selective Single Trigger. In this catalog the Model No. 32 “Skeet” Grade was introduced choked improved cylinder in both barrels, standard length 26-inch, with Remington Selective Single Trigger & Beaver Tail Fore-end for $97.90. Option of 28-, 30- or 32-inch barrels.

The February 15, 1935, Remington Arms Co., Inc. Retail Catalog offered the No. 32A “Standard” Grade with double triggers for $78.40, with the Remington Selective Single Trigger $16.50 extra. The No. 32D “Tournament” Grade was $250, The No. 32E “Expert” Grade was $300 and the No. 32F “Premier” Grade was $385. A raised solid rib was $8 extra, a ventilated rib was $20.40 extra, a Beaver Tail Fore-end was $3 extra and chambering for 3 inch shells $5.50 extra. Double triggers were gone from the trap guns. The No. 32TC “Target” Grade with vent rib was $123.80 and the No. 32S “Trap Special” with raised solid rib was $111.40. The Model No. 32 “Skeet” Grade now has Remington Special Skeet Boring in both barrels, standard length 26-inch, with Remington Selective Single Trigger & Beaver Tail Fore-end for $97.90 with plain barrel, $105.90 with raised solid rib and $118.30 with ventilated rib. Option of 28-, 30- or 32-inch barrels remained.

The March 6, 1936, Remington Arms Co., Inc. Retail Catalog offered the No. 32A “Standard” Grade with double triggers for $99.50, with the Remington Selective Single Trigger $16.50 extra. The No. 32D “Tournament” Grade was $250, The No. 32E “Expert” Grade was $300 and the No. 32F “Premier” Grade was $385. A raised solid rib was $8 extra, a ventilated rib was $20.40 extra, a Beaver Tail Fore-end was $3 extra and chambering for 3 inch shells $5.50 extra. The No. 32TC “Target” Grade with vent rib was up to $144.90 and the No. 32S “Trap Special” Grade with raised solid rib was $132.50. The Model No. 32 “Skeet” Grade with Remington Selective Single Trigger & Beaver Tail Fore-end was up to $119.00 with plain barrel, $127.00 with raised solid rib and $139.40 with ventilated rib. Option of 28-, 30- or 32-inch barrels remained.

The January 2, 1937, Remington Arms Co., Inc. Retail Catalog offered the No. 32A “Standard” Grade with double triggers for $99.50, with the Remington Selective Single Trigger $16.50 extra. The No. 32D “Tournament” Grade was $250, The No. 32E “Expert” Grade was $300 and the No. 32F “Premier” Grade was $385. A raised solid rib was $8 extra, a ventilated rib was $20.40 extra, and a Beaver Tail Fore-end was $3 extra. The No. 32TC “Target” Grade with vent rib was up to $144.90 and the No. 32S “Trap Special” Grade with raised solid rib was $132.50. The Model No. 32 “Skeet” Grade with Remington Selective Single Trigger & Beaver Tail Fore-end was up to $119.00 with plain barrel, $127.00 with raised solid rib and $139.40 with ventilated rib. Option of 28-, 30- or 32-inch barrels remained.

The January 3, 1938, Remington Arms Co., Inc. Retail Catalog offered the No. 32A “Standard” Grade with the Remington Selective Single Trigger for $126. The No. 32D “Tournament” Grade was $276.50, The No. 32E “Expert” Grade was $326.50 and the No. 32F “Premier” Grade was $411.50. A raised solid rib was $8 extra. No more vent rib on the field guns. The No. 32TC “Target” Grade with vent rib was up to $154.90. The Model No. 32 “Skeet” Grade with Remington Selective Single Trigger & Beaver Tail Fore-end was up to $129.00 with plain barrel, $137.00 with raised solid rib and $149.40 with ventilated rib. Option of 28-inch barrels remained.

According to the 1938 Dealer's Price List the No. 32A "Standard" Grade had a wholesale price of $100.80 and a retail price of $126. A raised solid rib was $6/$8. Extra barrels were $52.50/$60. The choice of barrel lengths was 26-, 28-, or 30-inch with choice of boring -- full, modified, improved cylinder or cylinder. Higher grades were the No. 32D "Tournament" grade for $232.50/$276.50; No. 32E "Expert" grade for $276.25/$326.50; and the No. 32F "Premier" grade for $350.60/$411.50. Grip style and stock dimensions to order on the higher grades, $13.10/$15.00 extra on the No. 32A.

The Trap gun was the No. 32TC "Target" grade for $123.35/$154.90 with 30- or 32-inch vent rib barrels. An extra set of vent rib barrels for the No. 32TC was $67.80/$80.40.

The No. 32 "Skeet" grade came with 26- or 28-inch barrels with "Remington Special Skeet boring." With a plain barrel $103.40/$129; with solid rib barrels $109.40/$137; and with vent rib barrels $118.70/$149.40.

All the No. 32s were offered in 12-gauge only. The only gun that regularly came with a pad was the No. 32TC, which is shown with a Hawkins with the heart-shaped holes. A recoil pad was $4.65/$5.50 extra on any Remington gun.

The No. 32 offerings in 1939 and 1940 were the same.

The June 10, 1941, Remington Arms Co., Inc. Catalog offered the No. 32A “Standard” Grade with the Remington Selective Single Trigger for $133.50. The No. 32D “Tournament” Grade was $292.90, The No. 32E “Expert” Grade was $345.90 and the No. 32F “Premier” Grade was $435.95. A raised solid rib was $8.50 extra. The No. 32TC “Target” Grade with vent rib was up to $164.10. The Model No. 32 “Skeet” Grade with Remington Selective Single Trigger, 26- or 28-inch barrels & Beaver Tail Fore-end was up to $136.65 with plain barrel, $145.15 with raised solid rib and $158.30 with ventilated rib.
The January 2, 1942, Remington Arms Co., Inc. Catalog offered the No. 32A “Standard” Grade with the Remington Selective Single Trigger for $153.55. A raised solid rib was $9.75 extra. The No. 32TC “Target” Grade with vent rib was up to $188.70. The Model No. 32 “Skeet” Grade with Remington Selective Single Trigger, 26- or 28-inch barrels & Beaver Tail Fore-end was up to $157.15 with plain barrel, $166.90 with raised solid rib and $182.00 with ventilated rib.

In the 1946 catalogue the No. 32s are pictured but overstamped "Not Available in 1946. I have an October 8, 1946, Retail Price List that prices the Model 32s but they are overstamped "Not Available in 1946. The No. 32A “Standard” Grade was $211.70. The No. 32D “Tournament” Grade was $464.55, The No. 32E “Expert” Grade was $548.55 and the No. 32F “Premier” Grade was $691.30. A raised solid rib was $13.15 extra. The No. 32TC “Target” Grade with vent rib was up to $259.60. The Model No. 32 “Skeet” Grade was $217.80 with plain barrel, $231.30 with raised solid rib and $252.00 with ventilated rib.

In the 1947 catalogue the No. 32s are pictured but overstamped "Not Available in 1947.

The Model 32s are gone from the May 1, 1948, Remington Arms Co., Inc. catalog.
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Unread 08-14-2019, 09:02 AM   #30
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Just a few observations: Yes, John, the 3200 28" gun is actually a 27 1/2" gun, and the 26" 3200 is actually a 25 1/2" gun. I seriously doubt that the 28 and .410 3200 barrels were made by Simmons. I think all four sizes were made by Remington. I assume the gun that Craig saw cracked at the Shenandale Club was a wood crack, not uncommon. Forends cracked often, stocks, not so much. Remington replaced forends for no charge for a long time, until I sent mine in and they charged me over $100 to replace it. I shot the 3200 for many years at registered NSSA skeet and NRA International Skeet. My 3200 was tubed by Kolar, a better choice for competitive skeet than the factory four barrel set. Simmons barrels worked fine but were a bit on the rough side, cosmetically. The Pigeon model had an engraved or stamped pigeon on the bottom of the frame. Otherwise, it would resemble a Competition Skeet model but with IM and F chokes. When Mr. McCormack and I were at Ilion in 1998, we saw highly engraved 3200s displayed in the entry foyer of the museum. This was years after 3200s were discontinued from the catalog. The Ennis engraved 3200s in the display case were "not for sale". However, on inquiring about them, I was told that I could order a new 3200 in any configuration at $2500 and up. At the time, I was at capacity for 3200s and decided I didn't need any more at that inflated price. Today's advice is not to buy a 3200 without the updates. The updates are very expensive on Laib's price list. I am down to one 3200 in the house, a 25 1/2" IC & MOD Field grade that once belonged to The Lovely Linda's late husband, still in new condition.
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