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Unread 12-07-2018, 08:47 AM   #41
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian Dudley View Post
Tru oil gives much more depth and color to a stock finish than tru-oil. Therein lies the major difference.
Ok I'm confused, "Tru oil and tru-oil." Is one Timberlux ?
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Unread 12-07-2018, 09:23 AM   #42
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Yeah... you heard me.

I meant tumberluxe gives more depth and color than tru-oil. I have corrected my original post.
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Unread 12-07-2018, 10:37 AM   #43
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No argument here. You finish a lot more stocks than I do. I just don't see much difference on the guns I have finished with Timberluxe. I stain most of my stocks with alkanet root so the color benefit of Timberluxe is not important to me.
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Unread 12-07-2018, 11:14 AM   #44
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True. I have been using Teak oil sealer with alkenes root for my sealer and filling coats a lot lately. It makes whatever I use for the top coat go a lot farther.
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Unread 12-07-2018, 11:16 AM   #45
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Years ago, I wrote an article for the Winchester Collector Magazine on wood finishes, off the top of my head (without pulling up my notes), a few key points:

The three most common plant oils which set (dry) on their own are linseed, walnut and tung; only drying oils form a cohesive, hard film when used as a wood finish.

Linseed oil has a few issues. When you first wipe linseed on a stock, the wood really pops… it’s gorgeous. But… linseed oil continues to oxidize, and darkens with age. I have seen some linseed finishes that were so dark that they were almost black.

As a wood protectant, linseed oil is not very good, it easily allows moisture and moisture vapor to penetrate.

Finally, it’s very slow drying and need the addition of metallic dryers.

The primary ingredients in Timberlux seem to be: Naphtha (thinner), equal amounts of linseed and sunflower oils and a smidgen of metallic driers. As noted above, linseed oil is not a great wood protector, and I have no idea on the protective qualities of sunflower oil as nobody recommend it for anything more than “food safe” applications such as cutting boards and salad bowls. And only if you cannot use walnut oil due to nut allergies.

Tru-Oil contains solvent, a proprietary modified oil and only about 13% linseed oil.

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Unread 12-07-2018, 09:25 PM   #46
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I use walnut oil to finish most of my salad and utility bowls. My understanding is that the two biggest benefits in that application is that it doesn’t.t turn rancid and that it slowly drys, both of these qualities are desirable for what I do. I never have known of walnut oil to be used as a finish for atheistic pieces. There are some blends that could possibly be alright. I appreciate the facts Mr. Hunter talked about.
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Unread 04-03-2019, 07:04 PM   #47
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mike Hunter View Post
The primary ingredients in Timberlux seem to be: Naphtha (thinner), equal amounts of linseed and sunflower oils and a smidgen of metallic driers. As noted above, linseed oil is not a great wood protector, and I have no idea on the protective qualities of sunflower oil as nobody recommend it for anything more than “food safe” applications such as cutting boards and salad bowls.
Mr. Board assures me that he does not add sunflower oil to his Timberluxe product. If someone has read that it contains sunflower oil it must have been listed on a MSDS sheet as an ingredient in one of the products that make up Timberluxe. Certainly if there was anything in a product he uses in Timberluxe that was at all detrimental in any way, he wouldn't be using it.





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Unread 04-04-2019, 01:49 PM   #48
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A couple of years ago, I was asked to do an article on Winchester wood finishes for the Winchester Collector magazine.

Just as Ford and General Motors don’t make their own paint, Winchester didn’t make its own satins & finishes, but instead purchased them from the XXX Company, a relationship that continued until the late 70s/early 80s.

Somewhere during my research, I was given a copy of Winchester’s wood finishing process circa 1903. I’m not talking pencil scribbling in a notebook, but step by step process laid out on original Winchester stationary: “two coats of XXX Company red brown #2 stain, allow to dry for a day, burnish, apply 1 coat of XXX Company #1 clear sealer”…etc. Unfortunately The XXX Company has been bought/sold several times so the original company no longer exists and the exact formulations are lost to time or the dumpster.

Around the same timeframe, I was approached by someone peddling Timberlux finishes, they told me they had the original formulation that Winchester used, which really got my attention. Then they followed up with some story about getting the recipe from a 90 year old former Winchester employee who used to make the finish at the Winchester factory. Ummm Ok… Great Story…. That’s about it.

As to Timberlux ingredients, the Material Data Safety Sheet (MSDS) is a legal document required by OSHA. Timberlux listed Naphtha (thinner), linseed/sunflower oils and metallic driers in their MSDS. Weather Mr. Board adds sunflower oil to the product or not is irrelevant, whoever makes it for him puts sunflower oil in it.

Now, my intent is not to disparage Timberlux or their products. I have never used their products so have no firsthand knowledge as to applicability. I use what works for me, and the finish that I need to achieve. Just stating what the list of ingredients is for Timberlux which is in the public domain
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Unread 04-04-2019, 02:18 PM   #49
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I appreciate that Mr. Hunter, but I'm still perplexed as to the concentration on the the inclusion of sunflower seed oil in the Timberluxe mixture.... why is anyone focusing on that ingredient? What's the big deal and why should we care? The Timberluxe product is in most ways superior to many other wood finishes when we want to attain a factory-like finish?

Best, Dean





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Unread 04-04-2019, 03:04 PM   #50
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Dean

In your second to last post, you seem to focus on the sunflower oil. In my earlier posts, I listed the published ingredients of Timberlux; I also did the same for Tru-Oil.

I truly don’t know the benefits or drawbacks to using sunflower oil except that it’s food safe, and should be great for cutting boards. That’s about all I can find on sunflower oil as a wood finish/protectant. Not a whole lot of folks using it for exterior/long term applications.

Again, linseed oil, while very popular as a wood finish, has issues; mostly that it does not truly protect wood from moisture, moisture vaper easily penetrates linseed oil.

While doing my research, I quickly determined that I would never know the make-up of Winchester’s wood finishes. So I focused on what materials they had at the time and what materials were used in other industries.

As a result, I focused on musical instruments; in many ways they have the same challenges: change in moisture content can change the note of a fine violin, sweat from hands, different climates etc. I contacted a noted luthier, and had a good hour long conversation with him. Seems that owners of Stradivarius violins are extremely picky about period finish.

I narrowed the primary ingredient list down to 3 or 4, with shellac based being the most common. There was not much to choose from pre-1920

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