Parker Gun Collectors Association Forums  

Go Back   Parker Gun Collectors Association Forums Non-Parker Specific & General Discussions General Discussions about Other Fine Doubles

Notices

Reply
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
POOR MAN'S MODEL 21-ALSO KNOWN AS THE CLUB
Old 09-13-2017, 04:43 PM   #1
Member
J. A. EARLY
PGCA Member
 
Jerry Harlow's Avatar

Member Info
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 964
Thanks: 946
Thanked 907 Times in 323 Posts

Default POOR MAN'S MODEL 21-ALSO KNOWN AS THE CLUB

I had the top Winchester Model 24 for about thirty years plus and had never shot it at game. The bottom one I got from Jim D. a month or more ago when I was looking for just a forend and ended up buying a whole kit gun, one that was disassembled with rusty barrels and missing four screws and a buttplate. It took me a while to figure out how a 24 goes back together. Rust blued the rusty barrels after striking them, found parts at Numrich, and put finish on the stock.

All I can say is this gun would be good if attacked, to use as a club. Bulky and very heavy is a good description. The top one was 7/12 (replaced stock) and the bottom one (original) is 8/2. Actions are stiff and awkward feeling. So I took them both hunting today for doves. Not many birds (raining) but the new to me gun shot well. What is funny about these is the top one is 1939 and the bottom one is about 1954 (they stopped keeping serial number records in 49) and both are marked M/F under the barrels. But both are really IC/F, one being .008 right and the other .012 right. Perfect chokes for doves.

Hardly fits "Other Fine Doubles" but a piece of Winchester and American History made in America for the bottom of the market.

Who owns one of these? I imagine a 20 would be the best of the lot.
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Win. Model 24s.jpg (320.7 KB, 9 views)
Jerry Harlow is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 6 Users Say Thank You to Jerry Harlow For Your Post:
Old 09-13-2017, 05:09 PM   #2
Member
Bill Murphy
PGCA Lifetime
Member Since
Second Grade

Member Info
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Posts: 9,644
Thanks: 3,194
Thanked 3,574 Times in 2,092 Posts

Default

When I was a pup, I had a minty 26" 20 gauge #26,497, oddly bored Cylinder and Modified. It is a rare boring, only made that way prewar, and I have never seen one like it. It was a great gun, but not the correct medicine for Pennsylvania wild pheasants. I would like to track it down, however.
Bill Murphy is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Bill Murphy For Your Post:
Old 09-13-2017, 05:23 PM   #3
Member
Roundsworth
PGCA Member
 
Mark Landskov's Avatar

Member Info
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,398
Thanks: 1,347
Thanked 501 Times in 278 Posts

Default

Ten years ago, I owned a 20 gauge Model 24 (27424) that was in 'near minty' condition. It was not as svelte as my RBL or Trojan, but, I wish I still had it.
__________________
GMC(SW)-USN, Retired
'Earnest Will'
'Desert Shield'
'Desert Storm'
'Southern Watch'
Mark Landskov is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Mark Landskov For Your Post:
Old 09-13-2017, 06:10 PM   #4
Member
winplumber
PGCA Member

Member Info
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 848
Thanks: 582
Thanked 218 Times in 154 Posts

Default

I have 12 and a 20 like em both I can pull the trigger on almost anything .
Steve Huffman is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 2 Users Say Thank You to Steve Huffman For Your Post:
Old 09-13-2017, 06:22 PM   #5
Member
Bill Zachow
PGCA Lifetime
Member

Member Info
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Posts: 535
Thanks: 384
Thanked 326 Times in 168 Posts

Default

The 24 was basically two model 37s put together and actually more than twice as ugly. Owned one about 20 years ago and had to sell it because I could not stand to look at it. Without a doubt, the model 24 was the ugliest pre 64 Winchester, hands down.
Bill Zachow is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to Bill Zachow For Your Post:
Old 09-13-2017, 06:25 PM   #6
Member
James L. Martin
PGCA Member
 
James L. Martin's Avatar

Member Info
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Posts: 146
Thanks: 137
Thanked 233 Times in 49 Posts

Default

I had one in 16ga, shot it good , just liked other guns more so I sold it.
__________________
" May you build a ladder to the stars climb on every rung and may you stay forever young "
Bob Dylan
James L. Martin is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to James L. Martin For Your Post:
Old 09-13-2017, 06:40 PM   #7
Member
Roundsworth
PGCA Member
 
Mark Landskov's Avatar

Member Info
 
Join Date: Jun 2010
Posts: 1,398
Thanks: 1,347
Thanked 501 Times in 278 Posts

Default

One thing I notice on many lower tier doubles, is the triggers. They look like two over-ripe bananas hanging there. Cost and ease of manufacturing obviously took precedence over appearance!

__________________
GMC(SW)-USN, Retired
'Earnest Will'
'Desert Shield'
'Desert Storm'
'Southern Watch'
Mark Landskov is offline   Reply With Quote
The Following User Says Thank You to Mark Landskov For Your Post:
Old 09-13-2017, 06:49 PM   #8
Member
charlie cleveland
PGCA Member

Member Info
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
Posts: 8,343
Thanks: 0
Thanked 3,418 Times in 1,856 Posts

Default

for the money a 24 would be hard to beat and a rugged gun they are...charlie
charlie cleveland is online now   Reply With Quote
The Following 3 Users Say Thank You to charlie cleveland For Your Post:
Old 09-13-2017, 09:12 PM   #9
Member
J. A. EARLY
PGCA Member
 
Jerry Harlow's Avatar

Member Info
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Posts: 964
Thanks: 946
Thanked 907 Times in 323 Posts

Default

They are really ugly with a super wide foreend. Little drop in the stock on the original one. The stock is ill-fitting, high everywhere and the one I refinished had a top lever dragging the proud wood, so after dragging against my newly refinished wood, I put it away after killing five out of nine with it. Really crude finish with no mating wood to receiver. But it is walnut with no checkering.

I rust blued the circa 1954 gun, but today I noticed what I believe to be original hot bluing on the entire 1939 gun (1st year they were made). I'm guessing they used a different solder by then and hot bluing was the economical way to make a gun.
Jerry Harlow is offline   Reply With Quote
Old 09-13-2017, 10:46 PM   #10
Member
Twoatlow8
PGCA Member

Member Info
 
Join Date: Dec 2009
Posts: 214
Thanks: 190
Thanked 63 Times in 40 Posts

Default

There must have been a huge profit in the model 24, I can not believe John Olin would have would have made it otherwise.
Scott Janowski is offline   Reply With Quote
Reply

Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:43 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.7.3
Copyright ©2000 - 2017, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 1998 - 2017, Parkerguns.org
Copyright 2004 Design par Megatekno
- 2008 style update 3.7 avec l'autorisation de son auteur par Stradfred.